David Conover's Famous Cousins
Person Page 668

         

David Blauvelt (M)
b. 21 June 1739, d. 2 May 1792, #33352
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=1st cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     David Blauvelt was born on 21 June 1739. He was the son of Abraham Blauvelt and Rachel Demarest. David Blauvelt was baptized on 24 June 1739 at Dutch Reformed Church, Tappan, Rockland County, New York. He married Annetje Westervelt, daughter of Johannes Westervelt and Efie De Groot, circa 1763. David Blauvelt died on 2 May 1792 at age 52.

Annetje Westervelt (F)
b. 13 December 1739, #33353
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Annetje Westervelt was also known as Annaetjin Westervelt. Annetje Westervelt was born on 13 December 1739. She was the daughter of Johannes Westervelt and Efie De Groot. Annetje Westervelt was baptized on 26 December 1739 at Dutch Reformed Church, Schraalenburgh, Bergen County, New Jersey. She married David Blauvelt, son of Abraham Blauvelt and Rachel Demarest, circa 1763. Annetje Westervelt married Jan Haring, son of John Haring and Amerensje Blauvelt, on 27 February 1795 at Kajuat (West Hempstead), New York. Annetje Westervelt left a will on 12 November 1802. She wrote a codicil on 25 December 1805. She was buried before 25 January 1806 at Dutch Reformed Church Churchyard, Ramapo. Her estate was proved on 25 January 1806.

Elizabeth Van Houten (F)
b. 15 April 1696, #33356
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Elizabeth Van Houten was baptized on 15 April 1696 at Dutch Reformed Church, Tappan, Rockland County, New York. She was the daughter of Theunis Roelofse Van Houten and Trytje Claes Cuyper. Elizabeth Van Houten married Isaac Blauvelt, son of Abraham Gerritsen Blauvelt and Grietje Minnelay, on 13 September 1718 at Dutch Reformed Church, Tappan, Rockland County, New York.

Child of Elizabeth Van Houten and Isaac Blauvelt
Elizabeth Blauvelt b. 24 Jun 1740, d. 4 Sep 1794

Elizabeth Blauvelt (F)
b. 24 June 1740, d. 4 September 1794, #33362
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=1st cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Elizabeth Blauvelt was born on 24 June 1740. She was the daughter of Isaac Blauvelt and Elizabeth Van Houten. Elizabeth Blauvelt was baptized on 26 June 1740 at Dutch Reformed Church, Tappan, Rockland County, New York. She married Jan Haring, son of John Haring and Amerensje Blauvelt, circa 1760. Elizabeth Blauvelt died on 4 September 1794 at age 54. She was buried after 4 September 1794 at Dutch Reformed Church Churchyard, Ramapo.

Capt. Aaron Van Cleave (M)
b. 26 July 1711, d. circa 1780, #33378
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=3rd cousin 7 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was born circa 1704 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York. He was also known as Capt. Aaron. Van Cleef. He was also known as Capt. Aaron Van Cleve. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was born circa 1710 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was born on 26 July 1711 at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York. He was the son of Isbrand Van Cleve and Janetje Aerse Vanderbilt. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave married Rachel Schenck, daughter of Jan Roelofse Schenck and Sara Willemse Van Kouwenhoven, in September 1734 at New York City, New York County, New York. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave married Rachel Schenck, daughter of Jan Roelofse Schenck and Sara Willemse Van Kouwenhoven, on 24 September 1734 at Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave resided at at Rowan County, North Carolina, circa 1751. He died circa 1780 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina. He was buried after 1780 at Burning Ridge Cemetery, Salisbury, North Carolina. He was buried at Joppa Cemetery, Salisbury, North Carolina. The Van Cleef Family by Wilson V. Ledley (Library of Congress #75-7491)

The following is copied from a manuscript loaned by R.S. Harvey:
Aaron Van Cleef was born, presumably about 1711, on Staten Island, the son
of Isabrant and Janneke Van der Bilt Van Cleef. He removed to New Jersey and
on September 24, 1734 he married at Middletown to Rachel Schenck, who was born
about 1709. So far as known Aaron was the first member of the family to spell
the name Van Cleave with an "A".
On October 17, 1737, Reuben Ruynon and Aaron Van Cleave were appointed
"chimney viewers" for the town of New Brunswick, and at the time Mayor James
Jude took office, that town was credited with ninety-one freeholders, among
them being Aaron and Benjamin Van Cleave. Therefore, Aaron must have moved to
New Brunswick shortly after his marriage.
It is said that Aaron and his brother Benjamin, were partners in some sort
of business, but what kind is not known. They became involved in debt, which
caused Aaron to move to North Carolina.
It seems that Aaron Van Cleave at one time was engaged in the coast-wise
trade as the Captain of a trading vessel. In the volume of newspaper
clippings, published as part of the Archives of New Jersey, are found various
references, to wits...
Van Cleave entered the Port of Boston, from Perth Amboy
(Boston New Letter, 22 Sep 1843)
Boston out, for Perth Amboy, 10 Oct 1748, Van Clief
(New York Postboy, 17 Oct 1743)
Boston out, 19 Oct Van Cleave for Perth Amboy
(News Letter 20 Oct 1743)
Custom House, Rhode Island, 16 Mar, Van Cleave from Perth Amboy.
(Postboy, 16 Apr 1744)
Newport, Rhode Island, 29 Jun, entered Aaron Van Cleave from Perth
Amboy.
Custom House, Boston, cleared Aaron Van Cleave, for Amboy.
(Boston New Letter 11 Oct 1744)
The will of Joseph Williams, of Squam, Monmouth County, N.J. 25 Jan 1763,
proved 11 Oct 1766, states that the sum of One Hundred Pounds was to be
collected from Captain Van Cleef, brother of Benjamin Van Cleef of Monmouth.
Aaron Van Cleef was a witness to the will of Alexander Henry, of New
Brunswick, Somerset County, N.J., 18 Mar 1744. In the spring of 1751 Aaron emigrated from New Brunswick, with his family,
and on 1 May 1751 he arrived at the forks of the Yadkin River, in Rowan County,
North Carolina, where he settled and spent the remainder of his life. At that
time the family is said to have consisted of the father, mother, seven sons and
one daughter.
In the Courthouse at Salisbury, North Carolina is the original record of
deed by which Daniel Boone transferred 640 acres of land to Aaron Van Cleave
for the sum of 80 pounds "Proclamation money of the State of North Carolina".
This deed is dated 21 Feb 1764 and was proved of record in the April 1764 term
of Court. It was signed by Daniel Boone and Rachel Boone, who made her mark
and witnessed by Thomas H. Holman, Samuel Bailey, who made his mark, and
Benjamin Van Cleave. The County Clerk was John Hiscock. The deed describes
the land, which was the first home of the Boones at the forks of the Yadkin
River, and shows the transfer of the tract on 29 Dec 1753, from the original
grant by the "Right Honorable John" Earl of Granville, to Squire Boone. On 12
Dec 1759, Daniel Boone, Planter bought this tract from his father for fifty
pounds.
Aaron Van Cleave at one time served as Constable in an for the "Lower end
of the Forks" of the Yadkin. He was one of the leaders of the group that met
at the "Dutchman's Creek Meeting House".
He is said to have attended and participated in the meetings in N.C. which
resulted in the appointment of the Committee of Patriots that drafted the
famous Hecklenburg "Declaration of Independence" 20 May 1775.
Aaron Van Cleave died in 1780 and is buried in the Burning Ridge Cemetery
at the forks of the Yadkin. His wife, Rachel, is said to be buried there also,
but whether she died before or after Aaron is not known. A tract of land was
granted in Kentucky in 5 Mar 1782 to Rachel Van Cleave. (Note: this is
probably Rachel Ryker-Van Cleave, the second wife of John Van Cleave, son of
Aaron). The will of William Van Cleave, in Mercer County, KY, 2 Sep 1786 was
witnessed by Rachel Van Cleave. Whether either of these was the widow of Aaron
is not known.
Of the seven sons of Aaron, one, Samuel, is said to have gone to Virginia,
and one, Thisgen, to Ohio. Of these two nothing more is known, except that a
descendant of Samuel once visited Rev. Johnathan Van Cleave at Crawfordsville,
Indiana.
The other five sons, with their sister Jane, went to Kentucky with the
Boones. John about 1775, William and Benjamin in 1776, Jane in 1777, and Ralph
and Aaron Jr. in 1785.
An undated petition in North Carolina, shortly prior to 1775, was signed
by Aaron, Benjamin, Ralph and William Van Cleave.
The families of William, Benjamin, and Jane settled first at Lynn's
Station and the Little Beargrass, a few miles from the Falls of the Ohio.


         

Compiler:
David Kipp Conover
9068 Crystal Vista Lane

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