David Conover's Famous Cousins
Person Page 5891

         

Robert Anderson (M)
#294501

     Robert Anderson married Elizabeth Bayard Clinch.

Child of Robert Anderson and Elizabeth Bayard Clinch
Martha Latham Anderson+ b. c 1856

Elizabeth Bayard Clinch (F)
#294502

     Elizabeth Bayard Clinch married Robert Anderson.

Child of Elizabeth Bayard Clinch and Robert Anderson
Martha Latham Anderson+ b. c 1856

Ethel Anderson Blair (F)
b. 1888, d. circa 1972, #294503
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=9th cousin 2 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Edward Montgomery Clift

     Ethel Anderson Blair was also known as Ethel Anderson-Fogg. Ethel Anderson Blair was born in 1888 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Woodbury Blair and Martha Latham Anderson. Ethel Anderson Blair married William Brooks Clift, son of Moses Henry Clift and Florence Virginia Parrott. Ethel Anderson Blair died circa 1972.

Children of Ethel Anderson Blair and William Brooks Clift
Brooks Clift b. c 1918
Edward Montgomery Clift b. 17 Oct 1920, d. 23 Jul 1966
Ethel Roberta Clift b. 20 Oct 1920

William Brooks Clift (M)
b. 18 December 1886, d. February 1964, #294504
Pop-up Pedigree

Appears on charts:
Edward Montgomery Clift

     William Brooks Clift was born on 18 December 1886 at Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee. He was the son of Moses Henry Clift and Florence Virginia Parrott. William Brooks Clift married Ethel Anderson Blair, daughter of Woodbury Blair and Martha Latham Anderson. William Brooks Clift died in February 1964 at New York at age 77.

Children of William Brooks Clift and Ethel Anderson Blair
Brooks Clift b. c 1918
Edward Montgomery Clift b. 17 Oct 1920, d. 23 Jul 1966
Ethel Roberta Clift b. 20 Oct 1920

Edward Montgomery Clift (M)
b. 17 October 1920, d. 23 July 1966, #294505
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=10th cousin 1 time removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Edward Montgomery Clift

     

Film and stage actor; born on October 17, 1920, in Omaha, Nebraska. Monty was the second born of twins. His mother, Sunny Clift, was the child of two southern aristocrats who gave her up for adoption, and she spent her life trying to groom her offspring for the aristocratic life she never had. The Clifts were taken on tours of Europe and tutored at home.

Monty escaped his repressive home life when he moved to New York and became a noted Broadway actor in the 1940s. An addiction to pills that began when he took painkillers for intestinal disease in the late 1940s was compounded by alcoholism.

Brooding, sensual, and classically handsome, Clift was wooed away from Broadway by Hollywood directors and starred in such film as Red River (1948). His performances in The Search (1948), A Place in The Sun (1951), and From Here to Eternity (1953) earned him Oscar nominations. In film after film, he portrayed troubled idealists whose actions often mirrored those in his own life.

In 1956, a car accident, caused not by alcohol but by long hours on the film Raintree Country, damaged his facial muscles. This both limited his range of expression and hurt his self-esteem. After this, Clift tended to take unglamourous roles which worsened his bad public image. A lawsuit with Universal Pictures and his growing addictions forced him into a four-year retirement in 1962.

Although he was preparing for a comeback in the mid 60s, he suffered a sudden, fatal heart attack in 1966.

Although many actors and actresses go to Hollywood seeking stardom, the roles were reversed in the beginning for Montgomery Clift. Hollywood went after him in search of a new star. Monty had already proven his talents on Broadway, and Hollywood producers and directors were constantly pursuing him to star in almost any film. In 1946, he conceded to their efforts. After 12 years of turning down every film script directors proposed, Monty finally found one script too intriguing to reject. It was a western co-starring John Wayne, titled Red River. The move from Broadway to Hollywood did not alter his dedication and desire for stage acting, but Monty’s life was soon filled with new and exotic experiences.

Montgomery Clift was born on October 17, 1920 in Omaha, Nebraska. His father, William Brooks Clift, was a successful Wall Street stockbroker. His mother, Ethel Anderson, filled both parental roles while her husband was away. She would often take Monty, his twin sister Roberta and older brother Brooks on long trips to Europe or spend time at their second home in Bermuda while their father was busy with work in New York. Private tutors traveled with the family to educate the children while abroad. When the stock market crashed in 1929, the Clift’s had to conform to a different lifestyle. They moved to a modest home in Sarasota, Florida when Monty was 13. He joined a local youth theatrical club there and tried acting for the first time. Montgomery was very committed to his work and his mother saw how natural he looked on stage. She started pushing Monty towards an acting career. His family moved to Sharon, Massachusetts where he auditioned for a part in the Broadway play, “Fly Away Home.” Monty was cast and the play ran for two seasons. His family moved to Manhattan when Monty secured another lead in the play “Dame Nature.” His lead in “Dame Nature” earned him Broadway star status at only 17.

Over the next three years, Monty took the lead in several Broadway plays including “There Shall Be No Night,” “The Skin of Our Teeth,” “Our Town” and “Foxhole in the Parlor.” During this time, members of the film industry continually tried to coax Monty to Hollywood. He rejected every offer. He loved to act, but he preferred the stage, not on camera. His passion was for Broadway. As with any growing young star, new horizons were inviting, and he finally decided to visit Hollywood for talks, but he was adamant about going there on his own terms. When MGM would not give him the agreements he requested, he walked out of the studio. Almost immediately United Artists agreed to what Monty’s terms and he was cast alongside John Wayne and Walter Brennan in what became one of the most famous westerns of all time, “Red River.” Monty was excited to try a new type of role with both film acting and a western movie. Soon after “Red River” was completed, he was asked to play American G.I. Ralph Stevenson in “The Search.” This heartfelt war story gave Monty his Hollywood fame.

Becoming a Hollywood star, Monty formed many new friendships. One of his close friends was Mira Rostova, who coached Monty in almost every acting role he had. Perhaps the most famous friendship in Monty’s life was his relationship with Elizabeth Taylor. The bond between them strengthened when the two starred together in” A Place in the Sun.” He would act with Taylor in two other films, “Raintree County” (1956) and “Suddenly Last Summer” (1959). He accepted both roles without even looking at a script. He just wanted to act with Taylor. After “A Place in the Sun,” Clift did not make a movie for two years.

His return to the movie screen was in “From Here to Eternity,” which won eight Oscars and earned Monty a Best Actor nomination. He went on to star in the Hitchcock film "I Confess” and the movie “Indiscretion of an American Housewife” before taking another leave from acting. Monty was not seen on a stage or screen for more than three years.

One night in May of 1957 Monty accepted an invitation from Elizabeth Taylor for a dinner party. Afraid he would not be able to see his way home on the winding road Monty was the first to leave that evening. He veered off the road and his car collided into a telephone pole. The accident left Monty with a broken jaw and nose, a crushed sinus cavity, two missing teeth and severe facial lacerations which required plastic surgery. His remarkable recovery let him return home after only eight weeks in the hospital.

After the accident, Monty starred in seven movies and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor in “Judgment at Nuremberg.” He also co-starred in “The Misfits,” which was Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable's last movie. Monty was set to co-star with Elizabeth Taylor in “Reflections in a Golden Eye,” but filming would not start until after the current project she was working on. So in the meantime, he was cast for “The Defector.” No one suspected this would be his last role. While waiting to begin work on “Reflections,” Clift suffered a heart attack and died in his home on July 23, 1966. At the age of 45, he was buried in Quaker Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York.
Edward Montgomery Clift was born on 17 October 1920 at Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska. He was the son of William Brooks Clift and Ethel Anderson Blair. Edward Montgomery Clift died on 23 July 1966 at Manhattan, New York County, New York, at age 45. He was buried at Quaker Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York.

John Garland (M)
b. circa 1640, #294506

     John Garland was born circa 1640. He married Susanna Ver Planck, daughter of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne, on 20 April 1669 at New York.

Child of John Garland and Susanna Ver Planck
Sylvester Garland+ b. c 1670

Sylvester Garland (M)
b. circa 1670, #294507
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=1st cousin 8 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Sylvester Garland was born circa 1670 at New York. He was the son of John Garland and Susanna Ver Planck. Sylvester Garland married Sootje Van Der Culine circa 1690. Sylvester Garland left a will on 17 October 1710 at New Castle, New Castle County, Delaware. His estate was proved on 19 June 1719.

Child of Sylvester Garland and Sootje Van Der Culine
Suit Garland+

Sootje Van Der Culine (F)
#294508

     Sootje Van Der Culine married Sylvester Garland, son of John Garland and Susanna Ver Planck, circa 1690.

Child of Sootje Van Der Culine and Sylvester Garland
Suit Garland+

Suit Garland (F)
#294509
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=2nd cousin 7 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Suit Garland was the daughter of Sylvester Garland and Sootje Van Der Culine. Suit Garland married James Anderson.

Child of Suit Garland and James Anderson
Garland Anderson+

James Anderson (M)
#294510

     James Anderson married Suit Garland, daughter of Sylvester Garland and Sootje Van Der Culine.

Child of James Anderson and Suit Garland
Garland Anderson+

Garland Anderson (M)
#294511
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=3rd cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Garland Anderson was the son of James Anderson and Suit Garland. Garland Anderson married Jane Chevalier, daughter of Peter Chevalier.

Child of Garland Anderson and Jane Chevalier
Elizabeth Anderson+

Jane Chevalier (F)
#294512
Pop-up Pedigree

     Jane Chevalier was the daughter of Peter Chevalier. Jane Chevalier married Garland Anderson, son of James Anderson and Suit Garland.

Child of Jane Chevalier and Garland Anderson
Elizabeth Anderson+

Peter Chevalier (M)
#294513

Child of Peter Chevalier
Jane Chevalier+

Sidney Breeze (M)
#294516
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=5th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Sidney Breeze is the son of Samuel Breeze and Elizabeth Anderson. Sidney Breese, who was prominently identified with the early legal and political history of Illinois, was born July 15, 1800, at Whitesboro, Oneida County, New York. He received a thorough classical education at Union College, Schenectady, New York, from which institution he was graduated in 1818. Elias Kent Kane, who was also one of the prominent early lawyers and statesmen in Illinois, was reared in the family of Breese, and educated in the same school. Kane, who was the senior of Breese, removed to Illinois Territory in 1816, settling at Kaskaskia, where he entered upon the practice of law. Soon after Breese graduated from Union College he accepted an invitation from Kane to join him and enter upon the study of law in Kane's office. In 1820 he was admitted to practice and began his professional career at Brownsville, Jackson County.

In his first attempt to conduct a case before a jury Breese was unsuccessful, and his defeat so affected him that he decided to abandon the profession of law and take up some work for which he might be better fitted. He was appointed postmaster at Kaskaskia in 1821, and shortly after his defeat in the first law suit apparently soon thereafter changed his mind and decided to engage again in the practice of law, for in 1822 he was appointed by Governor Bond attorney of the Second Circuit, a position which he retained for five years.

Breese's first and most prominent contribution to the profession was the preparation and publication of the first volume of decisions of the Illinois Supreme Court, which is said to be the first book published in the state. This volume is not only noteworthy as a collection of the early decisions, but it possesses many unusual features, among them being the foot notes to many of the decisions containing interesting and valuable comments by the compiler.

In 1832 Breese enlisted and served as lieutenant-colonel in the Blackhawk war, and upon its conclusion resumed the practice of law, in which he continued until 1835, when the Legislature established the Circuit Court system, and he was chosen judge of the Second Circuit Court, which position he retained until 1841, when he was elected one of the judges of the Supreme Court of the state.

In the following year, 1842, he was elected for a full term to the United States Senate, upon expiration of which he was defeated for re-election by Gen. James Shields. Upon retiring from the Senate he practiced law for nearly a year, and in 1850 was elected to the State legislature from the district comprised of Bond, Montgomery and Clinton counties, and was elected speaker of the House at the forthcoming session of the Legislature.

When not engaged in his duties as a member of the Legislature Breese practiced law until 1855, when he was again elected circuit judge. In 1857 upon the resignation of Chief Justice Scates he was returned to the bench of the Supreme Court, from the third grand division, in which position he remained until his death June 27, 1878.

During the long period of Breese's service on the bench, at a time when the problems confronting the court were not only complex, but often extremely irritating because of the constant conflict of the legislative, judicial and executive departments of the state, his deportment was invariably characterized by courtesy and impartiality. His opinions and judgments have received the highest commendation not only because of the integrity of the judge, but for his learning and ability.

While a member of the United States Senate Breese took decided ground in favor of the annexation of Texas, and advocated the title of the United States Government to Oregon up to line 54 degrees, 40 minutes; and strongly urged that the war with Mexico be carried into the heart of that country and the country finally annexed.

Prior to 1842 all lead mines in the country that had not been especially granted were owned by the Government, and leased to individuals. Senator Breese secured the passage of the bill providing for sale of such lands and thereby greatly facilitated the development of lead mining industry in Illinois, he also drafted the bill repealing the five years immunity from taxation after sale of public lands of the United States, and providing that such lands should become subject to taxation immediately after sale. This latter act was of importance to Illinois, as within its boundary there was an extensive area of Government lands that were being rapidly disposed of and it provided immediately receipt of revenue by the state after the sale of such lands.

One of the most important legislative acts with which Breese was connected was the bill providing for the grant of land to aid in railway construction, a scheme originated in 1835, which while it doubtless resulted in unjustly enriching railroad promoters, still had the effect of creating means of transportation much sooner than would otherwise have been possible. Breese seems to have seen in the Government lands a valuable asset for the industrial development of the country, inasmuch as he is said to be been in addition to the originator of the bill providing for the immediate taxation from the sale of such lands, and for the grant of lands to railroads, the originator of a plan providing for grants of land for the construction of a railroad from Lake Michigan to the Pacific Ocean.

Like many of his contemporaries, he was a man of force, and of vision, and without such as he the phenomenal development of the great mid-west would not have been possible.

Admiral Samuel Livingston Breeze (M)
#294517
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=6th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Admiral Samuel Livingston Breeze is the son of Arthur Breeze and Catherine Livingston. BREESE, Samuel Livingston, naval officer, was born at Utica, N.Y., in 1794. He began his naval career as midshipman in 1810, was commissioned Leutenant in 1816, and captain in 1841. In 1845 he was attached to the Mediterranean squadron in command of the frigate Cumberland, and during the Mexican war took part in the capture of Tuspan, Tabasco, and Vera Cruz. He was assigned to special duty on the great lakes in 1848; had command of the Norfolk navy yard from 1853 to 1855; of the Mediterranean squadron from 1856 to 1859; and of the Brooklyn navy yard from 1859 to 1861. In July, 1862, he was commissioned commodore. He was created rear-admiral on the retired list in September, 1862, and appointed light-house inspector. In 1869 he was port admiral at Philadelphia, and died at Mount Airy, Pa., Dec. 17, 1870.

Samuel Livingston, born Aug. 6, 1794; who married: first, Frances Hogan daughter of Jacob and Fanny (Carpender) Stout, about 1825, who died Jan. 8, 1853, without children; and secondly, Emma daughter of Thomas Lovett of New York City, June 21, 1855, who survives as his widow, without children; and died at Mount Airy near Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 17, 1870. He was a member of the Class of 1813 in Union College, without graduation; and at an early age "received his warrant as Midshipman in the United States Navy. In 1814 he served under Commodore McDonough at the battle of Lake Champlain, and for gallant conduct at Plattsburg received a sword and a vote of thanks from Congress. He served in the Mediterranean against the pirates of Algiers and otherwise, in 1826-7, and was in the Levant during the war between Turkey and Greece. He also served with distinction in the war between the United States and Mexico, in 1846-7 -- was at the battles of Vera Cruz, Tuspan and others: of the last named place he was for a short time Military Governor. As Commodore he commanded the United States Squadron in the Mediterranean in 1856-7, during the Crimean War. In 1861, at the outbreak of the rebellion in our Southern States, he was Commandant of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He was one of the thirteen Commodores first selected to fill the list of Rear Admirals, when that rank was introduced into the United States Navy in 1862. His last official duty was as Admiral of the Port of Philadelphia, in 1868."

Arthur Breeze (M)
#294518
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=5th cousin 4 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Arthur Breeze is the son of Samuel Breeze and Elizabeth Anderson. Arthur Breeze married Catherine Livingston, daughter of Henry Livingston and Sarah Wells.

Children of Arthur Breeze and Catherine Livingston
Samuel Sidney Breeze+
Admiral Samuel Livingston Breeze
Catherine Walker Breeze

Catherine Livingston (F)
#294519
Pop-up Pedigree

     Catherine Livingston is the daughter of Henry Livingston and Sarah Wells. Catherine Livingston married Arthur Breeze, son of Samuel Breeze and Elizabeth Anderson.

Children of Catherine Livingston and Arthur Breeze
Samuel Sidney Breeze+
Admiral Samuel Livingston Breeze
Catherine Walker Breeze

Sarah Wells (F)
#294520

     Sarah Wells married Henry Livingston.

Child of Sarah Wells and Henry Livingston
Catherine Livingston+

Henry Livingston (M)
#294521

     Henry Livingston married Sarah Wells.

Child of Henry Livingston and Sarah Wells
Catherine Livingston+

Catherine Walker Breeze (F)
#294522
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=6th cousin 3 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Catherine Walker Breeze is the daughter of Arthur Breeze and Catherine Livingston. Catherine Walker Breeze married Samuel Birdsill Griswold.

Samuel Birdsill Griswold (M)
#294523

     Samuel Birdsill Griswold married Catherine Walker Breeze, daughter of Arthur Breeze and Catherine Livingston.

Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker (M)
b. 1723, d. 16 August 1802, #294525
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=2nd cousin 7 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker was also known as John Knickerbocker. Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker was born in 1723 at Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York. He was the son of Johannes Knickerbocker and Anna Quackenbush. Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker married Rebecca Fonda, daughter of Claas Fonda and Anna Marselis, on 17 February 1750 at Dutch Reformed Church, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York. Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker joined the church at Dutch Reformed Church, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York, 22 November 1752. He died on 16 August 1802 at Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York. He was buried at Knickerbocker Cemetery, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York.

Children of Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker and Rebecca Fonda
Johannes Knickerbocker+ b. 29 Jan 1751, d. 10 Nov 1827
Anna Knickerbocker b. 11 Mar 1753, d. 1826
Neeltie Knickerbocker b. 24 Nov 1754
Elizabeth Knickerbocker b. 24 Nov 1754

Rebecca Fonda (F)
d. 1800, #294526
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=2nd cousin 8 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Rebecca Fonda was the daughter of Claas Fonda and Anna Marselis. Rebecca Fonda married Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker, son of Johannes Knickerbocker and Anna Quackenbush, on 17 February 1750 at Dutch Reformed Church, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York. Rebecca Fonda died in 1800 at Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York. She was buried at Knickerbocker Cemetery, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York.

Children of Rebecca Fonda and Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker
Johannes Knickerbocker+ b. 29 Jan 1751, d. 10 Nov 1827
Anna Knickerbocker b. 11 Mar 1753, d. 1826
Neeltie Knickerbocker b. 24 Nov 1754
Elizabeth Knickerbocker b. 24 Nov 1754

Anna Marselis (F)
#294527
Pop-up Pedigree

     Anna Marselis is the daughter of Gysbert Marselis and Barbar Claesen Groesbeck. Anna Marselis married Claas Fonda, son of Douwe Jellise Fonda and Rebecca Leendertse Conyn.

Child of Anna Marselis and Claas Fonda
Rebecca Fonda+ d. 1800

Gysbert Marselis (M)
#294528

     Gysbert Marselis married Barbar Claesen Groesbeck.

Child of Gysbert Marselis and Barbar Claesen Groesbeck
Anna Marselis+

Barbar Claesen Groesbeck (F)
#294529

     Barbar Claesen Groesbeck married Gysbert Marselis.

Child of Barbar Claesen Groesbeck and Gysbert Marselis
Anna Marselis+

Johannes Knickerbocker (M)
b. 29 January 1751, d. 10 November 1827, #294530
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=3rd cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Harmen Knickerbocker

     Johannes Knickerbocker was born on 29 January 1751 at Albany, Albany County, New York. He was the son of Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker and Rebecca Fonda. Johannes Knickerbocker married Elizabeth Winne, daughter of Willem Winne and Maria De Wandelaar, on 28 February 1769 at Dutch Reformed Church, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York. Johannes Knickerbocker died on 10 November 1827 at Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York, at age 76. He was buried at Knickerbocker Cemetery, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York.

Children of Johannes Knickerbocker and Elizabeth Winne
Herman Knickerbocker b. 17 Dec 1770
Wilem Knickerbocker b. 11 Dec 1771, d. a 11 Dec 1771
William Winne Knickerbocker b. 9 May 1773, d. 11 Jul 1846
Rebecca Fonda Knickerbocker b. 3 May 1775, d. 22 Feb 1834
Marytie DeWandelaer Knickerbocker b. 23 Mar 1777, d. 6 Apr 1843
Harmen Knickerbocker+ b. 27 Jul 1779, d. 30 Jan 1855
Derickye Knickerbocker b. 17 Jun 1781, d. a 17 Jun 1781
Derkje Knickerbocker b. 27 Jan 1783, d. 21 Dec 1833
Johannes Knickerbocker b. 7 Dec 1784
Ann Knickerbocker b. 19 Oct 1786, d. 25 Apr 1854
Elizabeth Winne Knickerbocker b. 17 Aug 1788, d. 30 Apr 1849
Neeltje Knickerbocker b. 12 Jun 1790
Cathalyntje Knickerbocker b. 23 Aug 1792, d. 16 Sep 1837
Abraham Knickerbocker b. 7 Apr 1796, d. 11 Mar 1869

Elizabeth Winne (F)
b. 6 April 1752, d. 10 November 1828, #294531
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=3rd cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Harmen Knickerbocker

     Elizabeth Winne was born on 6 April 1752 at Albany, Albany County, New York. She was the daughter of Willem Winne and Maria De Wandelaar. Elizabeth Winne was baptized on 12 April 1752 at Albany, Albany County, New York. She married Johannes Knickerbocker, son of Colonel Johannes Knickerbocker and Rebecca Fonda, on 28 February 1769 at Dutch Reformed Church, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York. Elizabeth Winne died on 10 November 1828 at Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York, at age 76. She was buried at Knickerbocker Cemetery, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York.

Children of Elizabeth Winne and Johannes Knickerbocker
Herman Knickerbocker b. 17 Dec 1770
Wilem Knickerbocker b. 11 Dec 1771, d. a 11 Dec 1771
William Winne Knickerbocker b. 9 May 1773, d. 11 Jul 1846
Rebecca Fonda Knickerbocker b. 3 May 1775, d. 22 Feb 1834
Marytie DeWandelaer Knickerbocker b. 23 Mar 1777, d. 6 Apr 1843
Harmen Knickerbocker+ b. 27 Jul 1779, d. 30 Jan 1855
Derickye Knickerbocker b. 17 Jun 1781, d. a 17 Jun 1781
Derkje Knickerbocker b. 27 Jan 1783, d. 21 Dec 1833
Johannes Knickerbocker b. 7 Dec 1784
Ann Knickerbocker b. 19 Oct 1786, d. 25 Apr 1854
Elizabeth Winne Knickerbocker b. 17 Aug 1788, d. 30 Apr 1849
Neeltje Knickerbocker b. 12 Jun 1790
Cathalyntje Knickerbocker b. 23 Aug 1792, d. 16 Sep 1837
Abraham Knickerbocker b. 7 Apr 1796, d. 11 Mar 1869

Harmen Knickerbocker (M)
b. 27 July 1779, d. 30 January 1855, #294532
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=4th cousin 5 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Harmen Knickerbocker

     

He was born 20 July 1779 and baptised (no date) as recorded at the Reformed Dutch Church of Schaghticoke. Wit.: Abraham Viele and Annatie Kneker. On 10 October 1801 he married as his first wife Arietta Lansing, who was born 17 July 1785 and baptised (as Arriaantje) 24 July 1785 as recorded at the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany (wit.: Leendert Gansevoort jr. and Maria Gansevoort), a daughter of Abraham A. Lansing and Elsje Van Rensselaer. She died 27 March 1814, aged 29 years. On 6 May 1814 he married as his second wife Rachel Wendel, who was born 10 April 1786 and baptised 23 April 1786 as recorded at the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany (wit.: None), a daughter of General Johannes H. Wendel and Cathalyntje Van Benthuysen. She died 29 July 1823. On 20 July 1826 he married as his third wife Mary Buel. Harmen was a lawyer and lived at Schaghticoke where he dispensed such generous hospitality that he became known as "Prince of Schaghticoke." There is a tradition to the effect that a clause in the Knickerbocker grants provides that the holder of the title to a certain tract of and must entertain the Mayor and Commonalty of Albany once a year, and this agreement was carried out strenuously. He was elected to the 11th Congress as a Federalist and served from 22 May 1809, till 3 March 1811. In 1816 he was chosen to State Assembly and also filled the office of County Judge. He is alluded to by Washington Irving in the Knickerbocker's History of New York as "My cousin, the congressman," and when Mr. Irving visited Washington he introduced him to President Madison as "My cousin Diedrich Knickerbocker, the great historian of New York." It was this intimate friendship which was the origin of Irving's humorous history of New York under the non de plume of Diedrich Knickerbocker. Harmen died on 30 January 1855 in Williamsburg, NY. Harmen Knickerbocker was born on 27 July 1779 at Albany, Albany County, New York. He was the son of Johannes Knickerbocker and Elizabeth Winne. Harmen Knickerbocker married Arietta Lansing on 10 October 1801. Harmen Knickerbocker held the position of Congressman to the Eleventh Congress between 4 March 1809 and 3 March 1811. He married Rachel Wendell on 6 May 1814. Harmen Knickerbocker married Mary Buel on 20 July 1826. Harmen Knickerbocker died on 30 January 1855 at Williamsburg now part of, New York City, New York County, New York, at age 75. He was buried at Knickerbocker Cemetery, Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York.

Children of Harmen Knickerbocker and Rachel Wendell
Harriett Knickerbocker b. 3 Nov 1815
Catalina Wendel Knickerbocker b. 11 Apr 1817
Maria Van Vechten Knickerbocker b. 9 Sep 1819
John Knickerbocker b. 18 Mar 1821
Rachel Jane Knickerbocker b. 9 Nov 1822

Willem Winne (M)
b. 22 April 1716, #294533
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=2nd cousin 7 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Harmen Knickerbocker

     Willem Winne was baptized on 22 April 1716. He was the son of Daniel Winne and Dirkje Van Ness. Willem Winne married Maria De Wandelaar in 1747. Willem Winne left a will on 2 February 1791 at Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York.

Child of Willem Winne and Maria De Wandelaar
Elizabeth Winne+ b. 6 Apr 1752, d. 10 Nov 1828

Daniel Winne (M)
b. circa 1678, d. 1757, #294534
Pop-up Pedigree

Appears on charts:
Harmen Knickerbocker

     Daniel Winne was born circa 1678 at Albany, Albany County, New York. He was the son of Pieter Winne and Tannetje Adams. Daniel Winne married Dirkje Van Ness, daughter of Jan Cornelise Van Ness and Aaltje (Unknown), on 16 March 1697/98 at Dutch Reformed Church, Albany, Albany County, New York. Daniel Winne died in 1757.

Children of Daniel Winne and Dirkje Van Ness
Peter Winne b. 1 Jan 1698/99
Jan Winne b. 1 Oct 1701
Killian Winne b. 17 Jan 1703/4
Jan Winne b. 19 Oct 1707
Frans Winne b. 8 Mar 1712/13
Willem Winne+ b. 22 Apr 1716
Tanneke Winne b. 1 Nov 1718
Aaltie Winne b. 1719
Maria Winne b. 29 Oct 1721
Adam Winne b. 12 Jan 1723/24
Cornelis Winne b. 23 Oct 1728

Dirkje Van Ness (F)
b. 1679, #294535
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=1st cousin 8 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

Appears on charts:
Harmen Knickerbocker

     Dirkje Van Ness was born in 1679. She was the daughter of Jan Cornelise Van Ness and Aaltje (Unknown). Dirkje Van Ness married Daniel Winne, son of Pieter Winne and Tannetje Adams, on 16 March 1697/98 at Dutch Reformed Church, Albany, Albany County, New York.

Children of Dirkje Van Ness and Daniel Winne
Peter Winne b. 1 Jan 1698/99
Jan Winne b. 1 Oct 1701
Killian Winne b. 17 Jan 1703/4
Jan Winne b. 19 Oct 1707
Frans Winne b. 8 Mar 1712/13
Willem Winne+ b. 22 Apr 1716
Tanneke Winne b. 1 Nov 1718
Aaltie Winne b. 1719
Maria Winne b. 29 Oct 1721
Adam Winne b. 12 Jan 1723/24
Cornelis Winne b. 23 Oct 1728

Ann Huff (F)
#294538

     Ann Huff married Joseph Reeder, son of Joseph Reeder and Susannah Gano.

Child of Ann Huff and Joseph Reeder
George Huff Reeder+ b. 24 Sep 1767, d. 13 May 1845

Joseph Reeder (M)
#294539
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=4th cousin 6 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Joseph Reeder was the son of Joseph Reeder and Susannah Gano. Joseph Reeder married Ann Huff.

Child of Joseph Reeder and Ann Huff
George Huff Reeder+ b. 24 Sep 1767, d. 13 May 1845

Susannah Gano (F)
#294540
Pop-up Pedigree
Relationship=3rd cousin 7 times removed of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Susannah Gano was the daughter of Daniel Gano and Sarah Britton. Susannah Gano married Joseph Reeder.

Child of Susannah Gano and Joseph Reeder
Joseph Reeder+

Joseph Reeder (M)
#294541

     Joseph Reeder married Susannah Gano, daughter of Daniel Gano and Sarah Britton.

Child of Joseph Reeder and Susannah Gano
Joseph Reeder+


         

Compiler:
David Kipp Conover
9068 Crystal Vista Lane

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Site updated on 14 Mar 2008 at 10:00:52 AM from FAMOUS; 16,852 people