David Conover's Famous Cousins
Person Page 13

         

Ezra Kingsley (M)
b. 15 August 1721, d. 1 November 1733, #605
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Relationship=5th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Ezra Kingsley was born on 15 August 1721. He was the son of Ezra Kingsley and Elizabeth Wight. Ezra Kingsley died on 1 November 1733 at age 12.

Elizabeth Kingsley (F)
b. 18 June 1727, #606
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Relationship=5th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Elizabeth Kingsley was born on 18 June 1727. She was the daughter of Ezra Kingsley and Elizabeth Wight.

Mary Kingsley (F)
b. 5 August 1730, #607
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Relationship=5th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Mary Kingsley was born on 5 August 1730. She was the daughter of Ezra Kingsley and Elizabeth Wight.

Alathea Smith (F)
b. 14 March 1757, d. 16 October 1792, #608

     Alathea Smith was born on 14 March 1757 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She married Salmon Kingsley Jr., son of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess, circa 1779 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. Alathea Smith died on 16 October 1792 at Ira, Vermont, at age 35.

Nathan Kingsley (M)
b. 23 January 1744, d. circa 1822, #627
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Relationship=4th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Nathan Kingsley was born on 23 January 1742/43 at Scotland, Windham County, Connecticut. Nathan Kingsley was born on 23 January 1744 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He was the son of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. Nathan Kingsley was baptized on 18 March 1744 at Scotland First Congregational Church, Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He married Roxanna Wareham circa 1762 at Connecticut. Nathan Kingsley married Roxanna Wareham circa 1763. Nathan Kingsley served in the 5th and 24th Regiments circa 1772. He resided at at Wyalusing, Pennsylvania, in 1775. He resided at at Wyoming, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, after 1775.
Nathan Kingsley appeared on the census of 1800 at Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. He died circa 1822 at Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio. He died in 1822 at Ohio. The following document on the Heckewelder House and Nathan Kingsley was provided to me by a distant relative and the source is unknown at this time.
"'The Heckewelder House' stood for many years in East Wyalusing, not far from where the Wyalusing Planing Mill is presently located. While it slowly crumbled into ruins, it was reputed to be the oldest house in Bradford County, having been constructed in the year 1768. There is no certainty as to who built the large log house, but it is known that one of the earliest occupants of the home was the celebrated Quaker missionary, Heckewelder.
"The house was later occupied by Nathan Kingsley, another early settler in Wyalusing, and it is by his name the house has been referred to for many years. Kingsley was the oldest son of Salmon Kingsley and was born in Scotland, Windham County, Connecticut, January 23, 1743. He married Roccelana Wareham, of the neighbor village of Windsor, and they settled in Wyalusing when both were about 30 years of age. According to one historical source, Kingsley was a member of one of Connecticut's prominent families of that time and a man of wealth and influence in that early day. His nephew, Professor James L. Kingsley, served on the faculty of Yale University.
"Nathan and Roccelana Kingsley came to Wyoming, Pennsylvania in 1772 or 1773. On January 8, 1776, he purchased from Elijah Brown, for 60 pounds, one half interest in a saw mill 'standing on a creek called by ye name of Moughshopping, together with one half ye stream, tools, and timber belonging thereto.'
"The precise date of Mr. Kingsley's settlement at Wyalusing cannot be ascertained. He was here previous to the survey of Wyalusing township, which was then called Springfield, in October, 1777, and had set off to him lots numbered 34 and 35.
"According to one historical source, 'Kingsley, by means of great watchfulness and prudence, lived for some time unmolested by the Indians, but at length, in June 1778, he was captured by Indians and taken to Niagara. While in captivity he secured the friendship and confidence of the Indians by doctoring their horses. He was, in consequence, allowed considerable liberty, and permitted to go into the woods to gather herbs and roots for his horse remedies. Seizing a favorable opportunity, he made a daring escape and returned many weeks later safely to Wyoming.
"During his captivity, Kingsley's wife and two sons fled to Wyoming, Pennsylvania, and took refuge in that settlement at the home of Jonathan Slocum, a member of the Friends Society. On November 2, 1778 the two boys were engaged in grinding a knife outside the Slocum cabin. A rifle shot and a cry of distress brought Mrs. Slocum to her cabin door where she saw young Nathan, a boy of fifteen years, being scalped by the knife he had been sharpening. One of the attacking Indians then entered the Slocum house and grabbed hold of a little boy named Ebenezer Slocum. The mother stepped up to the savage, and reaching for the child said, 'He can do you no good; see, he is lame.' With a grim smile giving up the boy, the Indian then grabbed Frances, her daughter, age about 5 years, and seizing the younger Kingsley lad by the hand, hurried away to the nearby forests. Two other Indians with him took a black girl, age 17 years, all of this dreadful episode occurring within one hundred rods of the Wilkes-Barre Fort. An alarm was sounded, but no trace of them was found. The story of the recapture of Miss Slocum 60 years later by her brother is a sad conclusion to one of the most thrilling episodes in the local history of the American Revolution.
"There is indication that later, in July of 1780, Kingsley served on a court martial and held the rank of Lieutenant in the army.
"After the troubles in and around Wyoming ceased, Mr. Kingsley, his wife and infant son, Wareham, returned to Wyalusing, having survived the perils of the war and now looked forward to a few years of quiet and comfort.
"Kingsley ... with some prominent area residents, was commissioned to assist with the organization of Luzerne County, of which Bradford County was then a part but known as such. He was named a judge in the first court constituted in the newly-formed county. However, in 1790 [sic], he resigned from the position because of the long distance necessary to travel to Wilkes-Barre where the court sessions were held. In his letter of resignation, Kingsley wrote: 'By reason of high water and living sixty miles from the county town, joined to the smallness of the fees I cannot continue to serve in such capacity.'
"There is not much known of Kingsley in his later years except that which appears in a history published in 1870 by the Wyalusing Presbyterian Church:
"'Mr. Kingsley, unfortunately, as an old man, acquired intemperate habits and became very poor, so that he became a town charge.'
"Nathan Kingsley had enough travail in his life to drive a man to drink. Captured by Indians and having his two older sons taken by the war in a most horrible manner. Even on returning he discovered his neighbors had taken advantage of him during his absence. According to CRAFT'S BRADFORD COUNTY HISTORY, during Kingsley's captivity apparently someone believed or at least hoped he would never return and so, the township committee 'changed the corners' of his property. Whatever happened to the wealth Kingsley was reputed to have brought to Wyalusing from his home in Connecticut has never been determined."
"A brief incident in Kingsley's final day on earth is known. Actually, Kingsley was only fifty-seven years of age when he was attempting to make his way home from a Wyalusing tavern and was suddenly over-taken by a violent summer storm. He sought refuge beneath a large pine tree and while standing there, his face turned upward and probably wondering what God had chosen next for him, a giant limb from above broke loose from the tree and fell to the ground, crushing the pioneer beneath its heavy weight. He is buried someplace in Wyalusing Cemetery where his grave remains unmarked and unknown. [See NOTE below.]
"Whatever became of Kingsley's wife and remaining son is not known. The Kingsley home in subsequent years continued to be occupied by early Wyalusing settlers and their families, but as more and more pioneers came to the community and the town began to grow on the west side of Wyalusing Creek, the old house became abandoned. It's huge hand-hewn squared logs became deteriorated and the shingled roof sagged, eventually falling to the ground. There were still signs of the old house, a few logs and the foundation, remaining as late as the early 1930's. As the cellar became a scourge of brambles and a haven for copperhead snakes, the old foundation was eventually filled in and all evidence of the historical structure, save a few large stones, passed into oblivion.
"The house was located on precisely the same area as the intersection of U.S. Route 6 and the spur to Route 187 is now situated. A few of the larger foundation stones are still in evidence beneath the outer edge of highway excavation at that point.
"It is to the everlasting shame of the residents of Wyalusing and vicinity that not enough pride in their historical heritage prevailed to consume them with the desire to save the old relic which had played such an important part in the history of their community. Now the landmark is like the people who dwelled within their walls--gone forever."
NOTE: Paragraph 13 contains information that is contradictory to other sources of information collected regarding the death of Nathan Kingsley.
According to Clement F. Heverly in his PIONEER AND PATRIOT FAMILIES OF BRADFORD COUNTY 1770-1880, Nathan Kingsley "is described 'as a large, tall man of more than ordinary intelligence, deeply interested in the prosperity of the community and the development of the county. He built a distillery, fell a victim of the habit of the times and in his old age lost his property.' He died in Ohio in 1822, aged 80 years. Mrs. Kingsley died in Wyalusing, and is buried in the old cemetery there. Wareham, the son, married Urania Turrell. They had children; Lydia (Mrs. Jabez Brown), Roswell, Nathan, Chester B., Abigail, and Roccelana. Nathan removed to Connecticut; Chester went south; Roswell died in Standing Stone. The father died at the home of his son, Nathan."

>From History of Wyoming County Penn. 1845 by Charles Miner, and from Vital
records of Windham Co. CT...........NATHAN KINGSLEY, born Windham Co. CT 23
Jan 1744, baptised 18 Mar 1744 at Scotland First Congregational Church by
Rev. Ebenezer Devotion, a son of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. NATHAN
removed to Wyoming Co PA with his wife Roxanna (Roccelana) Wareham. During
the Revolutionary War he was captured by Indians near Westmoreland PA on
July
1778. His wife with child in arms, her eldest son Nathan age 15 and a
younger son went to the farm of Jonathan Slocum, a Quaker, as he offered
Nathan's family shelter until Mrs. Kingsley could decide the future. In an
account given by Mr. Jonathan Slocum of which his wife was witness to an
event which took place on his farm located near Wilkebarre PA on 2 Nov 1778,
concerning the children of Nathan Kingsley: The son NATHAN KINGSLEY, age 15
and his younger brother along with a son of Mr. Slocum's heard a shot, going
to the door of the cabin, she saw Indians scalping the older Kingsley boy
and
taking the younger brother captive, along with her young son, he being her
lame son, so they exchanged the lame boy for her daughter named Frances age
seven. The daughter Frances Slocum returned home years later after marriage
in Ohio to an Indian Chief and a second marriage. When questioned about the
younger Kingsley boy, she said he died about the time she was approaching
womanhood.

>From Gen. Sullivan's Papers of 1779-1795 Vol 3 - extract letter from Gen.
Philip Schuyler to Gen Sullivan 29 July 1779......Certain Nathan Kingsley
who
was made prisoner in Oct 1777 near Wyoming and returned from captivity in
Canada, he appears a sensible and intelligent man and has given me a good
account of Niagara and Buck Island as they were last year. He has resided
all winter at LaShene and all spring to the third of last month near the
Cedars on the banks of the St. Lawrence since winter to the 30th.

NATHAN KINGSLEY later became a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War. After
war became Justice of Peace in Luzerne Co. PA. He later died in Ohio. He
was Mayflower connected by both his parents. On his father's side the
families of Sabin and Billington. On his Mother's side the families of Snow
and Hopkins.

Eunice Kingsley (F)
b. 9 July 1745, d. 29 April 1820, #628
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Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Eunice Kingsley was also known as Unice Kingsley. Eunice Kingsley was born on 9 July 1745 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She was the daughter of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. Eunice Kingsley was grandted land on 14 July 1745 at Scotland First Congregational Church, Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She married Jonathan Brewster on 12 February 1767. Eunice Kingsley died on 29 April 1820 at age 74.

Ebenezer Kingsley (M)
b. 26 April 1747, d. circa 1800, #629
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Relationship=4th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Ebenezer Kingsley was born on 26 April 1747 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He was the son of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. Ebenezer Kingsley was baptized on 12 July 1747 at Scotland First Congregational Church, Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He married Frances Bennett circa 1772. Ebenezer Kingsley answered to the Lexington Alarm from Canterbury, CT. In 1775 at Canterbury, Windham County, Connecticut. He resided at at Pawlett, Vermont, circa 1779. He died circa 1800. He died after 1830 at Winona, Shannon County, Missouri.

Elizabeth Kingsley (F)
b. 7 February 1748/49, #630
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Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Elizabeth Kingsley was born on 7 February 1748/49 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She was the daughter of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. Elizabeth Kingsley was baptized on 15 May 1751 at Scotland First Congregational Church, Windham, Windham County, Connecticut.

William Kingsley (M)
b. 15 July 1751, d. 1789, #631
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Relationship=4th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     William Kingsley was baptized on 19 May 1751 at Scotland First Congregational Church, Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. William Kingsley was born on 15 July 1751 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He was the son of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. William Kingsley married Elizabeth Leffingwell. William Kingsley He was a seaman on the ship "Protector" Commanded by Capt. John Foster Williams engaged Feb 7, 1780, discharged Aug 17, 1780. Same Vessell and Capt. engaged Oct. 3, 1780 reported captured May 3, 1781. Between 1780 and 1781. He died in 1789 at Olmaran, West Indies.

Jonathan Kingsley (M)
b. 15 May 1753, d. 12 September 1832, #632
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Relationship=4th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Jonathan Kingsley was born on 15 May 1753 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He was the son of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. Jonathan Kingsley was baptized on 20 May 1753 at Scotland First Congregational Church, Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He married Zillah Carey on 22 January 1777. Jonathan Kingsley resided at at Canterbury, Windham County, Connecticut, in 1813. He left a will on 24 June 1813

left son Jonathan his estate lying in Canterbury, CT of 140 acres.

He died on 12 September 1832 at age 79. He was buried after 12 September 1832 at Scotland First Congregational Church Cemetery, Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. The Inventory of Jonathan Kingsley was taken on 11 November 1832.

Lydia Kingsley (F)
b. 21 April 1760, #633
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Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Lydia Kingsley was born on 21 April 1760 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She was the daughter of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. Lydia Kingsley was born on 24 April 1760 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She married Timothy Rockwell.

Jerusha Kingsley (F)
b. 29 September 1762, #634
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Relationship=4th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Jerusha Kingsley was born on 29 September 1762 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. She was the daughter of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess. Jerusha Kingsley married David Bidwell.

Stephen Kingsley (M)
b. 3 June 1765, #635
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Relationship=4th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Stephen Kingsley was born on 3 June 1765 at Windham, Windham County, Connecticut. He was the son of Salmon Kingsley and Lydia Burgess.

Hester Jansen (F)
d. after 20 April 1653, #643
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     Hester Jansen was the daughter of Lijsbet Setten. Hester Jansen was also known as Hester Jans. She was also known as Hester Jensen. She published marriage intentions Jacobus Couwenhoven of Amersfoort residing in the Jonge Roelen Alley, 22 years old, asseisted by his uncle Rutgert Jansz, parents still living, marries Hester Jans of Haarlem, 22 years old, living on the Princes' Canal with her mother Lijsbert Setten.

He signes: Jacobus Couwenhoven on 14 November 1637 at Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. Hester Jansen married Jacob Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven, son of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter, on 1 December 1637 at New Church, Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands; Married by Domine Gelldorpus (Bible). Hester Jansen died after 20 April 1653.

Children of Hester Jansen and Jacob Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven
Neeltje Jacobse Van Kouwenhoven+ b. 18 Sep 1639
Johannes Jacobse Van Kouwenhoven+ b. 11 May 1641
Lysbeth Van Kouwenhoven b. 30 Aug 1643
Aeltje Jacobse Van Couwenhoven+ b. 20 Aug 1645
(Unknown) Van Kouwenhoven b. 6 Mar 1647, d. 7 Mar 1647
Petronella Jacobse Van Couwenhoven b. 7 May 1648, d. b 1674

Anna Remson (F)
#644

     Anna Remson married Jacob Willemse Van Kouwenhoven, son of Willem Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Jannetije Pieterse Monfoort, on 7 July 1685 at Queens Newton, New York.

Pietertje Cornelis Cool (F)
b. circa 1622, #645
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Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Pietertje Cornelis Cool was also known as Pieterje Cool. Pietertje Cornelis Cool was born circa 1622 at Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. She was the daughter of Cornelius Lambertse Cool and (Unknown) (Unknown). Pietertje Cornelis Cool married Claes Jansen Van Permerendt Kuyper before 1639.

Lambert Cornelis Cool (M)
b. circa 1624, #646
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Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr..

     Lambert Cornelis Cool was also known as Lambert Cool. Lambert Cornelis Cool was born circa 1624 at Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. He was the son of Cornelius Lambertse Cool and (Unknown) (Unknown). Lambert Cornelis Cool married Rebecca Britton. On an unknown date 1642: Document (MDC:18)
COPY: " I the undersigned (Lambert Cornelissen) hereby (acknowledge) (beforethe underwritten witnesses, at the request of) my father, Cornelis (Lambertsenhere present) that I am (fully paid and satisfied for my (deceased mother's estate which) until now has been in the custody of my (father) and my step(mother) Altien Braccongne, in witness whereof I Have signed this and (promise to ) hold myself satisfied in full, submitting myself to that end to all courts and justices. This done and signed the (-) May 1642 in Fort Amsterdam in New Ne (therland). And was signed with the follwing mark + near which was written: This is the mark of Lambert Cornelissen. Lower appeared the follwing mark + near which was written: This is the mark of Cornelis Lambersz. Was signed by Maurits Jansen and Willem Kieft, both as witnesses. "Discharge by Lambert Cornelissen for his share of his mother's estate.

Translated from the certified Dutch copy in New York, Colonial MSS., Vol. 2, p. 18 in the Manuscript Section of the New York State Library at Albany.
The Dutch copy is imperfect. Words in brackets have been suppled by the translator. 4 Oct 1933, A.J.F. van Laer.

Capt. Elbert Elbertse Stoothoff (M)
b. 1620, #647

     Capt. Elbert Elbertse Stoothoff was also known as Elbert Elbertson Stoothof. Capt. Elbert Elbertse Stoothoff was born in 1620. He married Aeltje Cornelis Cool, daughter of Cornelius Lambertse Cool and (Unknown) (Unknown), on 27 August 1645. Marriage banns for Capt. Elbert Elbertse Stoothoff and Sarah Janse Roeloffse were published on 21 July 1683 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New York County, New York.

Children of Capt. Elbert Elbertse Stoothoff and Aeltje Cornelis Cool
Heiltie Stoothoff
Achye Stoothoff+
Elbert Stoothoff b. 1648, d. c 1649
Gerrett Stoothoff+ b. c 1655, d. 1734

Hendrick Hendrickson (M)
b. 11 November 1706, d. 28 July 1783, #648
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     Hendrick Hendrickson was also known as Hendrick Hendrick. He was also known as Hendrick Hendricks. Hendrick Hendrickson was born circa 1704. Hendrick Hendrickson was born on 11 November 1706 at Monmouth County, New Jersey. He was the son of Hendrick Hendrickson and Helena Cortelyou. Hendrick Hendrickson married Altje Covenhoven, daughter of Albert Covenhoven and Neeltje Roelofse Schenck, circa 1728. Hendrick Hendrickson died on 28 July 1783 at age 76.


         

Compiler:
David Kipp Conover
9068 Crystal Vista Lane

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